Home Forums Get Help for Klok How do I backup my data – Linux

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  • #785
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Hi,

    I use openSuse 11.1 and I would like to backup my data. But the help just say it for Windows.

    Where is klok.dat on Linux systems?

    #1447
    Scott MckeownScott Mckeown
    Keymaster

    Check here

    /home/[username]/.appdata/Klok.long-random-characters-here/Local Store/klok.dat

    Scott

    #1448
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    USE Rhinoback backup software

    #1449
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Automate backup

    You may want to automate backup so you don’t have to add it to your calendar. It will actually be easier to automate the backup then create a calendar entry.

    I tend to keep things simple and easy, so I can show new users how easy it is to do such things under Linux. The solution that I use for automation is ‘crontab’. It’s simple, lightweight and does the job well. With Crontab I can configure when I want to run the rsync command: daily, weekly, monthly, or more than once a day (which I won’t do). I have configured mine to run at 11:30 p.m. every day after work so all of the files that I worked on throughout the day get synced.

    Depending on your distro you may have to install a package to get crontab on your system. If you are on Arch Linux, for example, you can install ‘cronie’. You can choose the default editor for crontab; I prefer nano. Run this command and replace ‘nano’ with the desired editor.

    export EDITOR=nano
    Now run ‘crontab -e’ to create cron jobs. It will open an empty file where you can configure the command that you want to run at a desired time. (See image, above.)

    The format of crontab is simple; it has five fields followed by the command:

    m h dm m dw command
    Here m stands for minutes (0-59); h for hour (0-23); dm for day of the month (1-31); m for month (1-12); and dw for day of the week (0-6 where 0 is Sunday). The format is numerical and you have to use ‘*’ to commend the fields that you don’t want to use.

    I run the command every day at 11.30 so the format will be

    30 23 * * * rsync -av –delete /media/hdd1/data-1/ /media/hdd2/data-2/
    If you want to run rsync only once a month then you can do something like this:

    30 23 1 * * rsync -av –delete /media/hdd1/data-1/ /media/hdd2/data-2/
    Now it will run at 11:30 p.m. on 1st of every month. If you don’t want it to run every month than you can configure it to run every six months:

    30 23 1 6 * rsync -av –delete /media/hdd1/data-1/ /media/hdd2/data-2/
    That will make it run every year on June 1. If you want to run more than one command, then create a new line for every command. Rsync is not the only command you can automate with ‘crontab’ you can run ‘any’ command using it.

    As you can see both tools – rsync and crontab – are extremely simple and lightweight yet extremely powerful and highly configurable. Linux doesn’t have to to complicated!

    Goldenslot

    #1450
    Anonymous
    Inactive
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